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Three years later, US still reeling from Capitol attack | International

Christopher Worrell, 52, a member of the far-right group the Proud Boys, was charged with pepper spray Thursday as a mob of Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 Sentenced to 10 years in prison for spray attack on police officer. Wearing combat vests and insulting agents, calling them “commies” and “scum.” His conviction is the last so far in an attack that shook the foundations of American democracy. Three years later, …

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Christopher Worrell, 52, a member of the far-right group the Proud Boys, was charged with pepper spray Thursday as a mob of Donald Trump supporters stormed the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021 Sentenced to 10 years in prison for spray attack on police officer. Wearing combat vests and insulting agents, calling them “commies” and “scum.” His conviction is the last so far in an attack that shook the foundations of American democracy. Three years later, the attack on the Capitol to prevent Joe Biden’s victory in the 2020 presidential election continues to largely mark the political and legal agenda in the United States as it enters a polarizing election year, but There were no open wounds. 6 people have recovered.

Trump defended the attackers, calling them “patriots,” downplayed the attack, insisting it was not an insurrection, calling Jan. 6 a “great day” and spreading conspiracy theories that have infiltrated across the United States. contributed to the discussion. among their constituents.A survey was published in Washington post This week, he revealed that 25% of Americans agree that the hoax that the FBI instigated the attack on the U.S. Capitol is “probably” or “definitely” true. The former president believes that what happened three years ago did not harm his interests. Facing a presidential election on November 5, this is likely to be a repeat of the confrontation between Trump and Biden in 2020.

Threat to democracy

Biden, meanwhile, sees the former president as a threat to democracy and has made that idea one of his key re-election messages. He just launched a campaign focused on this: “Something dangerous is happening in America. There is an extremist movement that does not share the fundamental beliefs of our democracy.” When images of the uprising emerged, he said in the ad: “They Now ask all of us what to do to preserve our democracy. “

This is not just politics. Despite the intersection of the two fronts, the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol remains little known in the courts. Special counsel Jack Smith accused Trump in Washington of trying to change the results of the 2020 presidential election, resisting for the first time a peaceful and orderly transition of power. Meanwhile, Colorado and Maine blocked him from running for office under the Insurrection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, and his primary candidacy was disputed in many other states.

Trump not only defended his innocence but also guaranteed presidential immunity for his actions. Furthermore, he argued that the attack on the Capitol was not an insurrection and that this constitutional provision did not apply to him.

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The final decision will ultimately be made by the Supreme Court, with a supermajority of six conservatives out of nine justices (three of whom were appointed by Trump). Three cases related to the Jan. 6 attack already span the street between the Capitol and the Supreme Court.

The first issue is the fact-related issue of presidential immunity. In response, the Supreme Court has sent the case back to the Court of Appeal, but it is likely to be returned to the original case. Additionally, Trump has already appealed his exclusion from the ballot and is likely to win because the interpretation of the provision is a bit of a stretch. Third, a district judge has accepted an appeal to have the crime of obstructing an official proceeding applied to the Jan. 6 riot, one of four for which Trump was charged in Washington. It’s a crime designed to punish anyone who resists or hinders an investigation in any way, from murdering witnesses to hiding evidence, but it’s unclear whether it would be appropriate in the current case. The judge’s decision could vacate dozens of convictions and set conditions for charges against the former Republican president.

Meanwhile, police and judicial institutions continue to address and condemn rebel participants who have been identified and detained. Matthew Graves, the U.S. attorney in Washington who is coordinating the Justice Department’s hunt for those responsible, noted at a news conference Thursday that the attack on the Capitol “may be the largest single-day attack on law enforcement officers.” “U.S. history”. According to the Justice Department, approximately 140 police officers were attacked at the Capitol on January 6, including approximately 80 officers from the U.S. Capitol Police and approximately 60 officers from the Metropolitan Police Department. Graves added: “It is vital that we remember the collective damage caused on January 6, 2021 and understand how it happened so we can ensure it does not happen again.”

A total of 1,237 people have been charged

According to the Department of Justice’s most recent report, updated in December, 1,237 defendants have been charged nationwide, with 714 pleading guilty to various federal charges (210 felonies and 504 misdemeanors), many of whom face prison sentences. A further 170 people were found guilty at trials. As a result, the cases of more than 350 defendants remain pending. The FBI is still hunting hundreds of attackers and maintains a wanted list.

Among those found guilty, some are awaiting sentencing. To date, 723 defendants have been convicted, 454 of whom were sentenced to prison terms. 151 people were sentenced to house arrest, 28 of whom were sentenced to concurrent imprisonment.

Members of the far-right militia Proud Boys and Oath Keepers received the harshest sentences. The largest sentence to date, 22 years in prison for Proud Boys chairman Enrique Tarrio, will be difficult to overcome. The judge defined him as the “ultimate ringleader of the conspiracy” and applied the aggravating factor of “terrorism”. Several Proud Boys lieutenants, like Tarrio, also received some of the harshest punishment, being found guilty of seditious conspiracy. Ethan Nordean, 18; Joe Biggs, 17; Zachary Rehl, 15.

For his part, Stuart Rhodes, founder and leader of the far-right group the Oath Keepers, an extremist paramilitary militia, was sentenced to 18 years in prison last May. He and his lieutenant, Kelly Meggs, were also sentenced to 12 years in prison for seditious conspiracy.

Trump has used the song at some of his rallies Justice for all, Chorus of people imprisoned for participating in Capitol attack sings national anthem (Star Spangled Banner, The Star-Spangled Banner), Trump himself recited the Pledge of Allegiance, and the prisoners chanted “USA” at the end. The former president said he would pardon the attackers if he returned to the White House.

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